Treating meningitis with corticosteroids

Viral meningitis is the most common type of meningitis, an inflammation of the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord. It is often less severe than bacterial meningitis, and most people get better on their own (without treatment). However, it’s very important for anyone with symptoms of meningitis to see a healthcare provider right away because some types of meningitis can be very serious, and only a doctor can determine if you have the disease, the type of meningitis, and the best treatment, which can sometimes be lifesaving. Babies younger than 1 month old and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe illness from viral meningitis.

Inflammation of the meninges may lead to abnormalities of the cranial nerves , a group of nerves arising from the brain stem that supply the head and neck area and which control, among other functions, eye movement, facial muscles, and hearing. [2] [16] Visual symptoms and hearing loss may persist after an episode of meningitis. [2] Inflammation of the brain ( encephalitis ) or its blood vessels ( cerebral vasculitis ), as well as the formation of blood clots in the veins ( cerebral venous thrombosis ), may all lead to weakness, loss of sensation, or abnormal movement or function of the part of the body supplied by the affected area of the brain. [2] [3]

Meningitis, sometimes referred to as spinal meningitis, is an inflammation of the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. [1] Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection, and differs in severity and treatment depending on the cause. Meningitis can be a severe illness and can cause serious consequences, including death. If you suspect you or someone you know may have meningitis, particularly someone vulnerable such as a child, it is important to seek treatment right away, as this can greatly improve the outcome of the illness. Learn to prevent meningitis, recognize its symptoms, and seek appropriate treatment.

An important limitation to this observational study is that it is unclear how many patients received perioperative antimicrobial therapy. This could have major implications for a negative CSF bacterial culture postoperatively, since the CSF may be infected but partially treated. For this reason, cessation of antimicrobial therapy is not recommended in patients who have received prior or are receiving concurrent antimicrobial therapy with a negative CSF culture and who are suspected of having bacterial meningitis based on clinical and laboratory findings (eg, CSF pleocytosis).

Treating meningitis with corticosteroids

treating meningitis with corticosteroids

An important limitation to this observational study is that it is unclear how many patients received perioperative antimicrobial therapy. This could have major implications for a negative CSF bacterial culture postoperatively, since the CSF may be infected but partially treated. For this reason, cessation of antimicrobial therapy is not recommended in patients who have received prior or are receiving concurrent antimicrobial therapy with a negative CSF culture and who are suspected of having bacterial meningitis based on clinical and laboratory findings (eg, CSF pleocytosis).

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