Ovarian aging follicular depletion and steroidogenesis

You can see from this small survey that there is some variation in desexing price and that, therefore, it paysto shop around. In this case, the difference in price would have been quite significant hadyou shopped around (you would have saved yourself $126). The travel distance between the highest andlowest priced clinics was only about 10-15 kilometers. Veterinary clinics are competitive entities and many will attempt to undercut others on price to secure you as a client.


How do vet clinics arrive at their charges?
Overall, veterinary clinics charge a lot of money for veterinary attention, surgery and medication for two main reasons: the high costs of running the practice (veterinary clinics are expensive to own and maintain)and the high costs of veterinary drugs and diagnostic equipment (drug companies charge vets a lot of money for the drugs we purchase). Staff costs are high, land rates are high, equipment costs are high and many drugs only have a certain limited shelf-life (used-by date), after which they can not be used and are therefore wasted, costing the practice money.

As a general rule, the larger, multiple-vet veterinary clinics tend to charge more fortheir surgical procedures and services than the smaller one to two man vet clinics do. This is often because the larger clinics have massive staffing and operational overheads that needto be met through higher charges, however, the higher costs can also sometimes be a sign ofthe quality of monitoring and patient care that your pet is receiving. The otherreason large vet clinics tend to charge a lot more for their services is becausethey can. They have enough clients and reputation built up to not feel a need to compete foryour business: if you can't afford their fees, they don't mind if you look elsewhereas it doesn't really affect their bottom line. On the flip side, sometimes large vet clinicswill actually charge less for their routine procedures, such as neutering, because they benefitfrom economics of scale (. big clinics can often save a lot of money on drugs and medications and charge their clients less for them because they make such large orders with drug companies that the drug companies give them significant discounts). In my small survey, clinics 2, 6 and 7 had some of the most competitive prices around and yet all three were very large, high-quality, multiple-vet practices that could have been expected to charge a lot more.

Many of the features found in human ovaries are common to all vertebrates, including the presence of follicular cells, tunica albuginea, and so on. However, many species produce a far greater number of eggs during their lifetime than do humans, so that, in fish and amphibians, there may be hundreds, or even millions of fertile eggs present in the ovary at any given time. In these species, fresh eggs may be developing from the germinal epithelium throughout life. Corpora lutea are found only in mammals, and in some elasmobranch fish; in other species, the remnants of the follicle are quickly resorbed by the ovary. In birds, reptiles, and monotremes , the egg is relatively large, filling the follicle, and distorting the shape of the ovary at maturity. [18]

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1) Feline Reproduction. In Feldman EC and Nelson RW: Canine and Feline Endocrinology and Reproduction, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

2) Feline Reproduction. In Daris W, editor: Compendium of Animal Reproduction, 5th ed. 1998, Intervet.

3) Physiology of Reproduction in Mammals. In Daris W, editor: Compendium of Animal Reproduction, 5th ed. 1998, Intervet.

4) The Urogenital Apparatus. In Dyce KM, Sack WO, Wensing CJG editors: Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

5) Verstegen J, Feline Reproduction. In Ettinger SJ, Feldman EC, editors: Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Sydney, 2000, WB Saunders Company.

6) Female Physiology Before Pregnancy and the Female Hormones. In Guyton AC and Hall JE: Textbook of Medical Physiology, 9th ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

7) The Nervous System. In Dyce KM, Sack WO, Wensing CJG editors: Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

8) Johnson CA, Disorders of the Estrous Cycle. In Nelson RW, Couto CG editors: Small Animal Internal Medicine, 2nd Ed. Sydney, 1998, Mosby Inc.





Female Cat in Heat - Copyright, October 19, 2009, -informed-veterinary-advice-.

"Pregnyl" is a registered trademark of Organon Australia Pty. Ltd.

Please note: the "female cats in heat" information provided on this page contains general recommendations and veterinary advice only. The information provided is based on published information; relevant veterinary literature and publications and my own experience as a practicing veterinarian. The advice given is appropriate to the vast majority of feline owners, however, owners with cats should take it upon themselves to ask their own veterinarian for further advice on feline estrus. Owners with specific circumstances (breeding cats, showing cats, stud cats, breeding businesses, those whose cats have hormone-mediated medical or behavioral issues, those seeking to control estrus artificially in breeding/showing queens etc.) should ask their vet what the safest and most effective protocol is for their situation.



Ovarian aging follicular depletion and steroidogenesis

ovarian aging follicular depletion and steroidogenesis

1) Feline Reproduction. In Feldman EC and Nelson RW: Canine and Feline Endocrinology and Reproduction, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

2) Feline Reproduction. In Daris W, editor: Compendium of Animal Reproduction, 5th ed. 1998, Intervet.

3) Physiology of Reproduction in Mammals. In Daris W, editor: Compendium of Animal Reproduction, 5th ed. 1998, Intervet.

4) The Urogenital Apparatus. In Dyce KM, Sack WO, Wensing CJG editors: Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

5) Verstegen J, Feline Reproduction. In Ettinger SJ, Feldman EC, editors: Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Sydney, 2000, WB Saunders Company.

6) Female Physiology Before Pregnancy and the Female Hormones. In Guyton AC and Hall JE: Textbook of Medical Physiology, 9th ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

7) The Nervous System. In Dyce KM, Sack WO, Wensing CJG editors: Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, 2nd ed. Sydney, 1996, WB Saunders Company.

8) Johnson CA, Disorders of the Estrous Cycle. In Nelson RW, Couto CG editors: Small Animal Internal Medicine, 2nd Ed. Sydney, 1998, Mosby Inc.





Female Cat in Heat - Copyright, October 19, 2009, -informed-veterinary-advice-.

"Pregnyl" is a registered trademark of Organon Australia Pty. Ltd.

Please note: the "female cats in heat" information provided on this page contains general recommendations and veterinary advice only. The information provided is based on published information; relevant veterinary literature and publications and my own experience as a practicing veterinarian. The advice given is appropriate to the vast majority of feline owners, however, owners with cats should take it upon themselves to ask their own veterinarian for further advice on feline estrus. Owners with specific circumstances (breeding cats, showing cats, stud cats, breeding businesses, those whose cats have hormone-mediated medical or behavioral issues, those seeking to control estrus artificially in breeding/showing queens etc.) should ask their vet what the safest and most effective protocol is for their situation.



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