Hemolytic anemia steroid therapy

Our treatment plan for Reyna was similar to most patients with IMHA however, given the risk of immunosuppressive steroids altering her insulin requirements and ultimately complicating her diabetes management we hoped to wean the steroids quickly. For this reason additional immunosuppresive medications were added aggressively to her treatment regime. Cyclosporine @ 5mg/kg BID, and Mycophenolate 5mg/kg BID. She was also administered 2 doses of IVIG at /kg 24 hours apart. Reyna required 4 packed red blood cell transfusions while in hospital and was managed with short acting insulin.

Persons who are on drugs which suppress the immune system are more susceptible to infections than healthy individuals. Chicken pox and measles , for example, can have a more serious or even fatal course in non-immune children or adults on corticosteroids. In such children or adults who have not had these diseases particular care should be taken to avoid exposure. How the dose, route and duration of corticosteroid administration affects the risk of developing a disseminated infection is not known. The contribution of the underlying disease and/or prior corticosteroid treatment to the risk is also not known. If exposed, to chicken pox, prophylaxis with varicella zoster immune globulin (VZIG) may be indicated. If exposed to measles, prophylaxis with pooled intramuscular immunoglobulin (IG) may be indicated. (See the respective package inserts for complete VZIG and IG prescribing information.) If chicken pox develops, treatment with antiviral agents may be considered. Similarly, corticosteroids should be used with great care in patients with known or suspected Strongyloides (threadworm) infestation. In such patients, corticosteroid-induced immunosuppression may lead to Strongyloides hyperinfection and dissemination with widespread larval migration, often accompanied by severe enterocolitis and potentially fatal gram-negative septicemia .

Intravenously administered glucocorticoids , such as prednisone , are the standard of care in acute GvHD [7] and chronic GVHD. [24] The use of these glucocorticoids is designed to suppress the T-cell-mediated immune onslaught on the host tissues; however, in high doses, this immune-suppression raises the risk of infections and cancer relapse. Therefore, it is desirable to taper off the post-transplant high-level steroid doses to lower levels, at which point the appearance of mild GVHD may be welcome, especially in HLA mis-matched patients, as it is typically associated with a graft-versus-tumor effect. [ citation needed ] . Cyclosporine and tacrolimus are inhibitors of calcineurin. Both substances are structurally different but have the same mechanism of action. Cyclosporin binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (known as cyclophilin), while tacrolimus binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase FKBP12. These complexes inhibit calcineurin, block dephosphorylation of the transcription factor NFAT of activated T-cells and its translocation into the nucleus [25] . Standard prophylaxis involves the use of cyclosporine for six months with methotrexate. Cyclosporin levels should be maintained above 200 ng/ml [26] . Other substances that have been studied for GvHD prophylaxis include, for example: sirolism, pentostatin and alemtuzamab [27] .

Hemolytic anemia steroid therapy

hemolytic anemia steroid therapy

Media:

hemolytic anemia steroid therapyhemolytic anemia steroid therapyhemolytic anemia steroid therapyhemolytic anemia steroid therapyhemolytic anemia steroid therapy